Transition of DNA-HPV over time in HPV-infected women: a 7-year cohort study

  • Linh My Duong Faculty of Medicine, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam
  • Dung Ngoc Tran Faculty of Medicine, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam
  • Tam Thi Pham Faculty of Public Health, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam
  • Trang Huynh Vo Faculty of Medicine, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam
  • Hung Do Tran Faculty of Medicine, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam
  • Tien Thi Thuy Lam Faculty of Basic Sciences, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam
  • Duc Long Tran Faculty of Medicine, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam
  • Quang Nghia Bui Faculty of Medicine, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam
Keywords: DNA, HPV infection, Vietnam, women
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Abstract

BACKGROUND Approximately 99% of cervical cancer cases worldwide are associated with one of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types. This study aimed to determine the transition rate of DNA-HPV over time in women aged 18–69 years with HPV infection in Can Tho City, Vietnam, from 2013 to 2020.

METHODS The 2-phase cohort study was conducted on 213 women between 2013 and 2020. Phase 1 involved a retrospective cohort study (2013–2018), and phase 2 included a prospective cohort study (2018–2020). HPV testing was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction on cervical fluid. McNemar’s test was employed to compare differences in HPV transition between 2013 and 2020.

RESULTS From 2013 to 2018, the transition, clearance, and non-transition rates were 17.1%, 65.8%, and 66.2%, respectively, revealing a significant difference in the number of HPV cases during this period (p = 0.007). From 2018 to 2020, the transition, clearance, and non-transition rates were 9.8%, 44.9%, and 82.2%, respectively. Overall, the DNA-HPV changes from 2013 to 2020 indicated rates of 14.3% for transition, 68.5% for clearance, and 67.1% for non-transition. A significant difference in HPV cases was found between 2013 and 2020 (p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS The longer duration resulted in a more significant difference in the DNA-HPV transition among HPV-infected women.

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Published
2024-07-02
How to Cite
1.
Duong LM, Tran DN, Pham TT, Vo TH, Tran HD, Lam TTT, Tran DL, Bui QN. Transition of DNA-HPV over time in HPV-infected women: a 7-year cohort study. Med J Indones [Internet]. 2024Jul.2 [cited 2024Jul.20];1(1). Available from: https://mji.ui.ac.id/journal/index.php/mji/article/view/7340
Section
Clinical Research