Food-induced brain activity in adult obesity: a quantitative electroencephalographic study

  • Kemas Abdurrohim Doctoral Program in Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia; Department of Medical Acupuncture, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • Pradana Soewondo Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • Fiastuti Witjaksono Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • Hasan Mihardja Department of Medical Acupuncture, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • Wresti Indriatmi Department of Dermatology & Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4876-992X
  • Heri Wibowo Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • Selfi Handayani Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Surakarta, Indonesia
  • Nurhadi Ibrahim Department of Medical Physiology and Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia; Neuroscience & Brain Development Cluster, Indonesian Medical Education and Research Institute (IMERI), Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia; Medical Technology Cluster, Indonesian Medical Education and Research Institute (IMERI), Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3682-0820
Keywords: brain wave, food, electroencephalography, obesity
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Abstract

BACKGROUND Obesity may be associated with declined food consumption control through neurological and behavioral processes, as well as heightened responsiveness of the brain’s reward systems. Performing neuroimaging and neurophysiological methods such as electroencephalography (EEG) can examine the connection between brain function and behavior. This study aimed to identify brain regulation of feeding behavior to food cues, which could be a potential neuromodulatory intervention target in adult obesity.

METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, involving 40 adults with obesity. EEG analysis was performed to measure electrophysiological brain activity during eyes-open condition and during exposure to high-calorie food cues. Student’s t-tests were performed to identify any significant differences between the groups (p<0.05).

RESULTS Beta waves in the frontal (channel F7) and gamma waves in the central (channels C3 and C4) and parietal (channels P3 and P4) regions were significantly increased during food cues compared to resting state/eyes-open condition without stimulation. Theta waves in the frontal (channels F7 and F8), central (channel C3), and parietal (channels P3 and P4) regions and alpha waves in the central (channels C3 and C4) and parietal (channels P3 and P4) regions were significantly decreased during food cues compared with resting state.

CONCLUSIONS In adults with obesity, increased beta activity in the frontal and gamma in the central and parietal regions suggested increased food-cue awareness and heightened attentional focus toward food stimuli. Additionally, decreased alpha and theta activities in frontal regions could underline deficits in executive functions and higher motivation.

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Published
2023-10-03
How to Cite
1.
Abdurrohim K, Soewondo P, Witjaksono F, Mihardja H, Indriatmi W, Wibowo H, Handayani S, Ibrahim N. Food-induced brain activity in adult obesity: a quantitative electroencephalographic study. Med J Indones [Internet]. 2023Oct.3 [cited 2024May22];32(2):98-104. Available from: https://mji.ui.ac.id/journal/index.php/mji/article/view/6974
Section
Clinical Research