Vitamin Dâ levels in the maternal serum, cord blood, and placenta of preeclamptic pregnant women

  • Noroyono Wibowo Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • Rima Irwinda Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6260-6273
  • Yohanes Handoko Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
Keywords: cord blood, serum, placenta, preeclampsia, vitamin D₃
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Abstract

BACKGROUND Preeclampsia is affected by oxidative stress, a free-radical produced as a by-product of endothelial damage, and antioxidant imbalance, such as vitamin Dâ. This study was aimed to compare the vitamin Dâ levels in the placenta, cord blood, and maternal serum between patients with and without preeclampsia. 

METHODS This cross-sectional study included 86 patients from Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital and Tangerang District Hospital, in which 47 had preeclampsia (13 early-onset and 16 late-onset preeclampsia cases) and 39 had no preeclampsia. The placenta, cord blood, and maternal serum were taken after labor, then were analyzed according to preeclampsia and non-preeclampsia; furthermore, the preeclampsia group was analyzed in a subgroup of early- and late-onset preeclampsia. This is analyzed with either unpaired t-test, MannâWhitney U test, or KruskalâWallis test. 

RESULTS The maternal serum, cord blood, and placental tissue vitamin Dâ levels (16.30 [6.20â49.00], 11.80 [3.50â38.60], and 49.00 [22.00â411.00] ng/ml, respectively) of the preeclampsia group were similar to those of the non-preeclampsia group (13.50 [4.80â 29.20], 11.70 [1.00â28.80], and 43.40 [11.80â153.00] ng/ml, respectively) (p = 0.459, 0.964, and 0.354, respectively). However, the placental tissue vitamin Dâ levels in early-onset preeclampsia (79.00 [36.00â411.00] ng/ml) were higher than those in late-onset preeclampsia (40.00 [22.00â171.00] ng/ml) (p = 0.006). 

CONCLUSIONS The vitamin Dâ levels between patients with and without preeclampsia were similar. However, the placental tissue vitamin Dâ levels in early-onset preeclampsia were higher than those in late-onset preeclampsia, possibly because of the different pathophysiology between early- and late-onset preeclampsia. 

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Published
2020-06-30
How to Cite
1.
Wibowo N, Irwinda R, Handoko Y. Vitamin D₃ levels in the maternal serum, cord blood, and placenta of preeclamptic pregnant women. Med J Indones [Internet]. 2020Jun.30 [cited 2020Oct.21];29(2):149-53. Available from: https://mji.ui.ac.id/journal/index.php/mji/article/view/2951
Section
Clinical Research